Geography 200 Portfolio

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Bivariate Map

Bivariate Map

This map was a true test of the many skills that were taught in Geography 200.  For this map, techniques were used from the choropleth map for one variable and the proportional symbol map for the other variable.  I sorted the data for the choropleth portion using the Jenks method of natural breaks and the proportional symbols were guided with excel data and manually scaled in Illustrator. The resulting product is an effective way to display two variables on one map.

Proportional Symbol Map

Proportional Symbol Map

For this map, the only element imported from ArcMap was the shape file of Wisconsin.  Everything else in the map was created manually in Adobe Illustrator.  Also done manually were the calculations of the sizes of each circle.  After obtaining data from the census bureau, the data was plugged into an excel formula which set the maximum value in the dataset at 100% and listed each other data value as a proportion of the maximum value.  This information was used in the scale tool in Illustrator to accurately proportion the symbols.

Choropleth Map

Choropleth Map

While choropleth mapping can be done nearly instantaneously in ArcMap, the bulk map was created entirely in Adobe Illustrator with only the blank shape files of North Carolina.  While the highlighting and coloring of each individual county was the most time consuming part of this map, the most valuable part would be learning how to manually sort and classify data in Excel

Hometown Reference Map

Hometown Reference Map

Continuing on a journey through the many uses of Adobe Illustrator, Geography 200 students were tasked to create another reference map.  This particular map involved exporting an aerial map from ArcMap and importing it into Illustrator where many hours were spent with the pen tool tracing countless elements of my hometown.  The process of cartographic generalization was key in creating this map in a visually pleasing, non-cluttered way.

GPS Map

GPS Map

For this map, the members of Geography 200 were provided with a Garmin eTrex GPS unit and sent to collect data (paths and points) to then download and overlay on an aerial image.  Several factors made this map production challenging.  The cartographer must make sure that the Datum from the GPS matches the settings in ArcMap, lest the data be transcribed incorrectly. Once the data was imported and overlaid on an aerial photo, the project was brought into Illustrator to make the aerial image slightly more transparent.